Category Archives: Video

Lunar New Year 2019

 

Year of the Pig (image shared by UBC)

Learn about the animals in Chinese Zodiac:

Watch this video produced for Lunar New Year 2015 and learn about some of the Lunar New Year traditions from the UBC community.

 

Teacher Resources:

Pink Shirt Day

pinkshirt_2017

Mark your calendar: Pink Shirt Day is February 22nd, 2017.

pinkshirt_poster_2017

 

Wear something pink to show that we are all working together to erase bullying in our community.

Portraits of Kindness:

Watch the clip below.  What is kindness to you, to your family and how can you show kindness in your community?

Think about this prompt:

“Kindness is……”

Here are some great recommendations for books about kindness.  Visit your school library to find even more!

pinkshirt_kindbooks_2017

Teacher Resources:

Growth Mindset

Welcome to learning in 2017!  

It’s a great time of year to set goals for new learning challenges and adventures.  Watch the videos below for an introduction to the idea of using a ‘Growth Mindset’ as you learn new ideas this year.

Human Rights Day 2020

A right delayed is a right denied.

– Martin Luther King Jr.

Shared by TC2 -Thinking Teacher:

December 10th commemorates the day when the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). Translated into almost 500 languages, the UDHR details the fundamental rights of citizens around the world. Each year, we are reminded of our collective responsibility to stand up and defend these rights not only for ourselves, but also on behalf of those who may not be in a position to do so.”

2020 Theme:

Recover Better – Stand Up for Human Rights

“Human Rights must be at the centre of the post COVID-19 world.

The COVID-19 crisis has been fuelled by deepening poverty, rising inequalities, structural and entrenched discrimination and other gaps in human rights protection. Only measures to close these gaps and advance human rights can ensure we fully recover and build back a world that is better, more resilient, just, and sustainable.

  • End discrimination of any kind: Structural discrimination and racism have fuelled the COVID-19 crisis. Equality and non-discrimination are core requirements for a post-COVID world.
  • Address inequalities: To recover from the crisis, we must also address the inequality pandemic. For that, we need to promote and protect economic, social, and cultural rights. We need a new social contract for a new era.
  • Encourage participation and solidarity: We are all in this together. From individuals to governments, from civil society and grass-roots communities to the private sector, everyone has a role in building a post-COVID world that is better for present and future generations. We need to ensure the voices of the most affected and vulnerable inform the recovery efforts.
  • Promote sustainable development: We need sustainable development for people and planet. Human rights, the 2030 Agenda and the Paris Agreement are the cornerstone of a recovery that leaves no one behind.” (United Nations, 2020)

What are human rights?  How are we connected to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights ?

Watch the videos below and think about our responsibilities to ourselves, our families and our communities.

Have you heard of UNDRIP? Watch the video below to learn about Indigenous rights.

For Teachers:

“The resources featured this month will inspire younger students to think critically as active citizens while they examine the concept of fairness as it relates to a situation in a fictional community.”

 Free resources:

Thoughtful Books: Each One Special by Frieda Wishinsky and H. Werner Zimmerman  [PDF]

Grade range: Primary

View more resources in the Thoughtful Books collection

From Amnesty International:

“Downloadable activities to accompany the award-winning book ‘We Are All Born Free’ – thirty beautiful illustrations that interpret our human rights for ages 5+.

Illustrators include Axel Scheffler (of Gruffalo fame), Korky Paul and John Burningham. The activities available to download below introduce the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) through creative writing and story-telling.”

We Are All Born Free can be ordered from the Amnesty shop.

‘Amnesty’s delightful book We Are All Born Free explains the importance of human rights through truly beautiful illustrations. It is clear, simple and uplifting and makes it very easy to raise difficult subjects, even with young children. It is a wonderful educational tool and I strongly believe that every school should own a copy.’
Actress and author Emma Thompson

Downloads
We Are All Born Free – Activity
We Are All Born Free – Powerpoint

Hour of Code

The Hour of Code is celebrated in early December each year, but you can participate year round!  Watch the videos below to be inspired by the idea of creating and computational thinking.

You can try coding with any type of device.  You can try coding without a device!  Code.org has activities for trying coding on all kinds of tools and paper activities as well.

Remember, you need your family’s permission if you want to try coding on an app or program that asks you to create an account or  for any of your personal information.

Your teacher librarian might even have some books about coding in the school library!

 

 

FAQs (Source: Code.org)

What is the Hour of Code?

The Hour of Code started as a one-hour introduction to computer science, designed to demystify “code”, to show that anybody can learn the basics, and to broaden participation in the field of computer science. It has since become a worldwide effort to celebrate computer science, starting with 1-hour coding activities but expanding to all sorts of community efforts. Check out the tutorials and activities. This grassroots campaign is supported by over 400 partners and 200,000 educators worldwide.

When is the Hour of Code?

The Hour of Code takes place each year during Computer Science Education Week. The 2016 Computer Science Education Week will be December 5-11, but you can host an Hour of Code all year round. Computer Science Education Week is held annually in recognition of the birthday of computing pioneer Admiral Grace Murray Hopper (December 9, 1906).

Why computer science?

Every student should have the opportunity to learn computer science. It helps nurture problem-solving skills, logic and creativity. By starting early, students will have a foundation for success in any 21st-century career path. See more stats here.

How do I participate in the Hour of Code?

Start planning here by reviewing our how-to guide. You can organize an Hour of Code event at your school or in your community — like in an extracurricular club, non-profit or at work. Or, just try it yourself when Dec. 5 arrives.

Who is behind the Hour of Code?

The Hour of Code is driven by the Hour of Code and Computer Science Education Week Advisory and Review Committees as well as an unprecedented coalition of partners that have come together to support the Hour of Code — including Microsoft, Apple, Amazon, Boys and Girls Clubs of America and the College Board.

I don’t know anything about coding. Can I still host an event?

Of course. Hour of Code activities are self-guided. All you have to do is try our current tutorials, pick the tutorial you want, and pick an hour — we take care of the rest. We also have options for every age and experience-level, from kindergarten and up. Start planning your event by reading our how to guide.

What devices should I use for my students?

Code.org tutorials work on all devices and browsers. You can see more information about Code.org’s tutorial tech needs here. Tech needs for non-Code.org tutorials can be found on code.org/learn in the tutorial specific description. Don’t forget we also offer unplugged activities if your school can’t accommodate the tutorials!

Do I need computers for every participant?

No. We have Hour of Code tutorials that work on PCs, smartphones, tablets, and some that require no computer at all! You can join wherever you are, with whatever you have.Here are a few options:

  • Work in pairs. Research shows students learn best with pair programming, sharing a computer and working together. Encourage your students to double up.

  • Use a projected screen. If you have a projector and screen for a Web-connected computer, your entire group can do an Hour of Code together. Watch video portions together and take turns solving puzzles or answering questions.
  • Go unplugged. We offer tutorials that require no computer at all.

I am in Canada. How do I participate internationally?

Anyone can organize an Hour of Code event, anywhere in the world. Last year, students worldwide joined together for the Hour of Code. Find out more here.

Do students need to log on using an account?

No. Absolutely no signup or login is required for students to try the Hour of Code. Most of the follow-on courses require account creation to save student progress. Also, signing up for the Hour of Code does NOT automatically create a Code Studio account. If you do want to create accounts for your students, please follow these instructions.

Remembrance Day

2016 Remembrance Day Resources

Veterans Affairs:

Information about and significance of the National Aboriginal Veterans Monument :national-aboriginal-monument

Song: A Pittance of Time

Interactive Activity: (Ages 10+)

Over the Top: An Interactive Adventure

“An activity created by the Canadian War Museum to help students understand the First World War from a soldier’s perspective. The activity’s interactive nature and its animation-based format will appeal to younger students. Includes a glossary of terms. (Recommended for ages 10 and up.)”

Canadian Encyclopedia Articles:

Picture Book Month

November is Picture Book Month! 

Author Katie Davis produced this video with quotes from beloved and famous authors and illustrators all answering the same question;

“What is a picture book?”

For Students:

What is a picture book to you?  Do you have a favourite picture book?  Visit your school library to borrow picture books this month.

You might like these books for “Roc Your Mocs” Day in November:

moccasins3moccasins moccasins2  moccasins4

Calendar:

picturebookmonthcalendar2016-color-1

picbkmnthcalendar2016-bw-1

How the Calendar Works

“Each day, an author/illustrator, our Picture Book Month Champion, is listed. On that day he/she has an essay posted on the Picture Book Month website about the importance of picture books. Check back every day of November for a new essay.

Each day is also marked with a theme. Use these daily themes to plan story times, blog about your favorite picture books in that theme, or create themed displays.” (Source: Picture Book Month, Calendar)

For Teachers:

Picture Book Month Teacher’s Guide (Ideas for using picture books in ELA, Science, Math and Social Studies)

Why Picture Books are Important:

rukhsana-khan-book-coverRukhsana Khan

rob-scotton-book-coverRob Scotton

ame-dyckman-coverAme Dyckman

 

Healthy Harvest

Autumn is a season full of rich traditions and celebrations in many cultures and nations.  It is a wonderful time to get outside and use all of your senses to observe changes on the land, in the air, and along our waterways.

Many schools are learning about apples, pumpkins, salmon and other food sources that are ready to harvest at this time of the year. There are wonderful books in your school library about cycles of growing, visiting farms, and autumn traditions.

Here is a song about the life cycle of a pumpkin:

Do you have a favourite fall activity?  What do you like about this season?  Do you have a favourite autumn meal in your family and/or community?

Better Together BC is a great place to find family-friendly recipes and resources.  Here are a few highlights that you might like to use at home or at school:

kindergardenchef

letstalk_octblogpost

the-spatulatta-405x460

“Spatulatta teaches children to cook with free step-by-step videos. It encourages children to take pride in their accomplishments in the kitchen and to understand the connection between farm and dinner table. It also encourages children to ask their family members and friends for recipes and to cook those dishes together.” (Better Together BC)

 For teachers:

My Seasonal Round was shared by Dewdney Elementary as an integrated unit for elementary Social Studies and Science.

“This unit illustrates the integration of Social Studies and Science. The seasonal round was chosen as a theme for this unit because it lends itself well to integrating the topics of BC First Nations study in Social Studies, and habitat in Science.”

Fire Prevention

firepreventionweek

Fire Prevention Week

October 9 to 15, 2016

This year’s theme is “Don’t Wait, Check the Date!  Replace smoke alarms every ten years.”

fireinfoeng fireinfofr

Here are some fun ways to learn about fire safety and the importance of smoke detectors:

Teach Fire Safety using resources from the National Fire Protection Association :

International Dot Day

Make your mark this school year!  September 15th-ish is International Dot Day!  Join the celebration of creativity, courage and collaboration! Based on the story “The Dot” by Peter H. Reynolds, this is a great way to start the year by celebrating the creative talents of children.

Watch the videos below to see examples of students collaborating creatively and get inspired to create:

 Resources:

International Dot Day website: Get Inspired

Every Child Matters

OrangeShirtDay

September 30th has been declared annually as Orange Shirt Day to recognize the harm that was done to children in the residential school system and that ‘Every Child Matters’ as we move forward with the Truth and Reconciliation process.

This video clip shares Phyllis’ story about the origins and importance of Orange Shirt Day.

Mission’s Orange Shirt Day Event: The March to Heritage Park

On September 30th, 2016, students from MSS, HPMS, HMS and a few classes from participating elementary schools will march to Heritage park, (the site of St. Mary’s Indian Residential School).

  • All students and staff in the district will receive an Orange Pin from Siwal Si’wes to mark the day.
  • Before the march, each student will be given a card stock Turtle, outlining the year of Truth (and what it represents), discussing the purpose for “Orange Shirt Day” and the injustices of Canada’s Residential School system.
  • Each student will decorate their turtle and write a word or “commitment” of Reconciliation.
  • The students will march in orange shirts to the park.
  • Students and staff will be met by elders who attended St. Mary’s .
  • Each student will place their turtle into a cedar basket in front of the Elders.
  • There will be a few words from Elders at the covered area, some drumming and a small give away to each participant of a Reconciliation pin.

Turtle Design FL

Additional information for Educators:

Father’s Day

Sunday, June 19th is Father’s Day.  Here are some great ideas to show Dads how much we appreciate them. There is also a song about families and some inquiry activities around the question “What makes a family?”.

Book Trailer: Gator Dad by Brian Lies (released in May, 2016)

Gator Dad Activity kit

Activities: (From a post on  Wonderopolis)

“How will you celebrate Father’s Day? Here are some fun activities you can explore with a friend or family member:

  • Does your dad like to golf? Challenge him to a fun game that’s just a little different than what he might be used to. Play Frisbee Golf! (There is a course at Centennial Park in Mission!)
  • Think about all the fun times you’ve had with your dad over the years. Make your own homemade Father’s Day card to show him how much he means to you. Include special memories of the most special times you’ve spent together. Have fun reminiscing about the good ol’ days!
  • Treat dear old Dad to a special day of relaxation in the backyard. Get him a comfy chair, offer to do a few chores, fix him a nice lunch, grab him a refreshing drink, and then after he’s had a nice nap, play some fun backyard games together! Enjoy the day celebrating the special father figures in your life!”

What Makes a Family?  Watch and listen to the song and try the activities from Wonderopolis below.

Read/listen to another Wonder-of-the-day:  “What Makes a Family?”  Try some of  the family activities (and look at a very cute photo of a meerkat family).

Earth Hour

A message from the World Wildlife Fund (WWF):

“The 10th annual Earth Hour takes place at 8:30 p.m. local time on Saturday, March 19, 2016. Six continents, over 170 countries, and 24 time zones will be united as a global community, making our voices heard through individual action.

Turn off as much power as you can and focus on your commitment to climate action for the rest of this year.”

Earth Hour Activities:

Read a book by flashlight!  How about “Franklin in the Dark”?  Visit your school library to borrow a great book to read for Earth Hour.

Franklin

 

World Read Aloud Day

“On February 24, 2016 Lit World encourages children, parents, teachers, other educators, and librarians to read aloud. Lit World’s World Read Aloud Day (#WRAD16) champions the importance of telling stories no matter where one is around the globe.”

Watch and listen to Karma Wilson read aloud from her book “Bear Snores On”.

You can find more stories to watch and read along with on the World Read Aloud Day website.

Black History Month

February is Black History Month.  Take some time to learn about the accomplishments and contributions of black Canadians with these resources:

Government of Canada, Black History Month website:

“Every year, Canadians are invited to participate in Black History Month festivities and events that honour the legacy of black Canadians, past and present. Canadians take this time to celebrate the many achievements and contributions of black Canadians who, throughout history, have done so much to make Canada the culturally diverse, compassionate and prosperous nation it is today. During Black History Month, Canadians can gain insight into the experiences of black Canadians and their vital role in the community.”  Resources include:

20 Notable Black Inventors Infographic (American and Canadian)

Black Inventors Infographic

 

Have a Heart Day

This message is from the First Nations Child & Family Caring Society of Canada (FNCFCS) website:

“Have a Heart Day is a child and youth-led reconciliation campaign that brings together caring Canadians to help ensure First Nations children have the services they need to grow up safely at home, get a good education, be healthy, and be proud of who they are.

Activity Ideas:

  • Host a Valentine’s Day party to raise awareness in your school or community. Choose a day leading up to Valentine’s Day that makes sense for your class or community.
  • Spread the word through social media like YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook. Use the hashtag #HaveaHeartDay.

Explore the Have a Heart Day website to download Have a Heart Day resources, and to order bookmarks and buttons!  There is also an information sheet entitled “Reconciliation is all of us”.

Through activities like Have a Heart Day, we are creating a movement where the landscape of Canada is only one of honour and possibility for First Nations children.”

FNCFCS also shared this music video by N’we Jinan Artists “Important to Us”, written and performed by students at Pierre Elliot Trudeau School: