Tag Archives: December

Human Rights

 

A right delayed is a right denied.

– Martin Luther King Jr.

Shared by TC2 -Thinking Teacher:

December 10th commemorates the day when the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). Translated into almost 500 languages, the UDHR details the fundamental rights of citizens around the world. Each year, we are reminded of our collective responsibility to stand up and defend these rights not only for ourselves, but also on behalf of those who may not be in a position to do so.”

What are human rights?  How are we connected to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights ?

Watch the videos below and think about our responsibilites to ourselves, our families and our communities.

Have you heard of UNDRIP? Watch the video below to learn about Indigenous rights.  Wouldn’t it be great if Canada officially signed this document in its 150th year of Confederation?

For Teachers:

From TC2: Thinking Teacher

“The resources featured this month will inspire younger students to think critically as active citizens while they examine the concept of fairness as it relates to a situation in a fictional community.”

 Free resources:

Thoughtful Books: Each One Special by Frieda Wishinsky and H. Werner Zimmerman  [PDF]

Grade range: Primary

View more resources in the Thoughtful Books collection

From Amnesty International:

“Downloadable activities to accompany the award-winning book ‘We Are All Born Free’ – thirty beautiful illustrations that interpret our human rights for ages 5+.

Illustrators include Axel Scheffler (of Gruffalo fame), Korky Paul and John Burningham. The activities available to download below introduce the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) through creative writing and story-telling.”

We Are All Born Free can be ordered from the Amnesty shop.

‘Amnesty’s delightful book We Are All Born Free explains the importance of human rights through truly beautiful illustrations. It is clear, simple and uplifting and makes it very easy to raise difficult subjects, even with young children. It is a wonderful educational tool and I strongly believe that every school should own a copy.’
Actress and author Emma Thompson

Downloads
We Are All Born Free – Activity
We Are All Born Free – Powerpoint

Hour of Code

The Hour of Code is celebrated in early December each year, but you can participate year round!  Watch the videos below to be inspired by the idea of creating and computational thinking.

You can try coding with any type of device.  You can try coding without a device!  Code.org has activities for trying coding on all kinds of tools and paper activities as well.

Remember, you need your family’s permission if you want to try coding on an app or program that asks you to create an account or  for any of your personal information.

Your teacher librarian might even have some books about coding in the school library!

 

 

FAQs (Source: Code.org)

What is the Hour of Code?

The Hour of Code started as a one-hour introduction to computer science, designed to demystify “code”, to show that anybody can learn the basics, and to broaden participation in the field of computer science. It has since become a worldwide effort to celebrate computer science, starting with 1-hour coding activities but expanding to all sorts of community efforts. Check out the tutorials and activities. This grassroots campaign is supported by over 400 partners and 200,000 educators worldwide.

When is the Hour of Code?

The Hour of Code takes place each year during Computer Science Education Week. The 2016 Computer Science Education Week will be December 5-11, but you can host an Hour of Code all year round. Computer Science Education Week is held annually in recognition of the birthday of computing pioneer Admiral Grace Murray Hopper (December 9, 1906).

Why computer science?

Every student should have the opportunity to learn computer science. It helps nurture problem-solving skills, logic and creativity. By starting early, students will have a foundation for success in any 21st-century career path. See more stats here.

How do I participate in the Hour of Code?

Start planning here by reviewing our how-to guide. You can organize an Hour of Code event at your school or in your community — like in an extracurricular club, non-profit or at work. Or, just try it yourself when Dec. 5 arrives.

Who is behind the Hour of Code?

The Hour of Code is driven by the Hour of Code and Computer Science Education Week Advisory and Review Committees as well as an unprecedented coalition of partners that have come together to support the Hour of Code — including Microsoft, Apple, Amazon, Boys and Girls Clubs of America and the College Board.

I don’t know anything about coding. Can I still host an event?

Of course. Hour of Code activities are self-guided. All you have to do is try our current tutorials, pick the tutorial you want, and pick an hour — we take care of the rest. We also have options for every age and experience-level, from kindergarten and up. Start planning your event by reading our how to guide.

What devices should I use for my students?

Code.org tutorials work on all devices and browsers. You can see more information about Code.org’s tutorial tech needs here. Tech needs for non-Code.org tutorials can be found on code.org/learn in the tutorial specific description. Don’t forget we also offer unplugged activities if your school can’t accommodate the tutorials!

Do I need computers for every participant?

No. We have Hour of Code tutorials that work on PCs, smartphones, tablets, and some that require no computer at all! You can join wherever you are, with whatever you have.Here are a few options:

  • Work in pairs. Research shows students learn best with pair programming, sharing a computer and working together. Encourage your students to double up.

  • Use a projected screen. If you have a projector and screen for a Web-connected computer, your entire group can do an Hour of Code together. Watch video portions together and take turns solving puzzles or answering questions.
  • Go unplugged. We offer tutorials that require no computer at all.

I am in Canada. How do I participate internationally?

Anyone can organize an Hour of Code event, anywhere in the world. Last year, students worldwide joined together for the Hour of Code. Find out more here.

Do students need to log on using an account?

No. Absolutely no signup or login is required for students to try the Hour of Code. Most of the follow-on courses require account creation to save student progress. Also, signing up for the Hour of Code does NOT automatically create a Code Studio account. If you do want to create accounts for your students, please follow these instructions.