Category Archives: Event

National Indigenous History Month

Local Kwantlen Elders: (Part 1 & 2)

 

Virtual Ways to Participate:

Books: Robot Beaver, Secret of the Dance, & Stoney Creek       Woman (in progress).

  • Fry Bread Friday Videos:
  • Government of Canada Learning Resources (English) (French)
    • Includes activity guides and posters
  • Canadian Encyclopedia Article (English) (French)

Educator Guides:

  • NIMMIWG –Their Voices Will Guide Us:  Student & Youth Engagement Guide (Early Learning – Gr.12) (p.1 to p. 19 for K to 5)
  • Walking Together: First Nations, Metis and Inuit Perspectives in Curriculum  The digital resource Walking Together: First Nations, Métis and Inuit Perspectives in Curriculum was designed to help teachers understand the holistic nature of First Nations, Métis and Inuit ways of knowing; to provide opportunity for Inuit, First Nations and Métis peoples to share their perspectives on topics important to them; and to demonstrate First Nations, Métis and Inuit perspectives in teaching and learning experiences.
  • The Secret Life of the North (CBC):How has the North been impacted by forces of colonization and why have many Canadians not known about the history, geography, and society of the Inuit? This episode explores the history and geography of the North; examines the distinct culture, language and politics of the Inuit; and recognizes the impacts of colonization on the Inuit.Possible teaching connections include Geography, History, Social Studies, Indigenous Studies, Civics, and Anthropology.

FVRL 2020 Summer Reading Club

SUMMER READING CLUBS

Explore our universe! Discover the great unknown this summer when you join FVRL’s 2020 Summer Reading Club. There is a club for everyone!

  • Read To Me (0 to Preschool) Share stories, record reading, collect stickers, win prizes and get a medal.
  • Kids (grades K to 6) Collect a reading record, enter prize draws, come to fun shows and earn a medal. Just read every day!
  • Teens (grades 7 to 12) Read. Record. Repeat. It begins when you sign up online for a SRC reading record. Includes chances to win fantastic prizes.
  • Adults Sign up for a reading record and mark your reading to enter prize draws. The more you read, the more chances to win.

How do I join? Sign up starts June 12 and continues throughout the summer.

How does it work? You and your family members can sign up online and download a reading record! Record every day that you read for fifteen minutes or more! You can read anywhere! Once you have recorded seven days of reading, you can enter our online contest for great prizes!

Programs and Events

It wouldn’t be Summer Reading Club without a great lineup of events throughout the summer. We have virtual storytellers, puppet shows, parties, awards ceremonies and more! Check out our spectacular guest performers.

  • Norden the Magician: Norden is back with a magic show full of amazing tricks and wacky gags. Be prepared to join the fun!
  • Puppets with Elspeth: Master puppeteer Elspeth and her puppet friends present rollicking fun stories and songs that will help unlock new discoveries as we explore.
  • Panagaea Arts: Panagaea Arts presents Stories on Wheels. Based on Kamishibai, a traditional form of travelling street theater from Japan. Tales are brought to life by high-energy comic performance, music, and dramatic action.
  • Music with Marnie: Discover the fun of music with Marnie. Sing along and dance as Marnie presents old favourites and new original songs. The music will make you move!

A full list of the SRC 2020 virtual events will be listed on our Events page soon!

Accessible Summer Reading Club

Find accessible Summer Reading Club titles through NNELS. FVRL also has ebook and audiobook formats to better serve customers with perceptual disabilities. Ask library staff for more information. (Source: FVRL, June 2020)

Ready to get reading!  FVRL Express is up and running!

Beginning June 1 you can start picking up library holds using our FVRL Express – Click, Pick, Go. The new contactless service offers customers a physically distanced way to pick up library holds and return items at all 25 locations.

Click on the image below for more information:

National Poetry Month 2020

 

From the League of Canadian Poets:

“We hope that this theme will inspire conversations, poems, and dialogues about the many ways poetry is expressed and honoured around the world, as well as the cultural impacts of poetry in different regions. We encourage poets from around the world to speak and write about what poetry means for their life experiences, perspectives and identity as well as the roots of poetry in their culture or country.

“What will you read this National Poetry Month? Will you start your own poetry writing project? Will you write your first poem? Will you share your poetry on stage for the first time?

  1. Tumblebooks has some fun poetry video books to read online:  (username: tumble735, password: books)

Cat Named HaikuA Cat Named Haiku: Haiku is a form of Japanese poetry. Haiku is also a little cat who can’t seem to stay out of trouble. “A Cat Named Haiku” tells the story of the day in the life of a mischievous little cat, as he learns a valuable lesson on love told completely in haiku. After disobeying his owner, Haiku discovers at the end of the day even if someone is mad at you it doesn’t mean they don’t still love you. From climbing the curtains to trying to eat the pet goldfish, all of Haiku’s antics are chronicled in the three line poetry of his namesake in this 40 page children’s book intended for ages 6 and up.

Ook the BookOok the Book

Ook the Book seems like it’s been around forever, dog-eared from decades of readings and rereadings. It could be the jaunty Seussian rhythms at play, but it has a classic quirkiness all its own–a blend of Calef Brown’s Polkabats and Octopus Slacks and the good Dr. Seuss’s The Cat in the Hat. With poem titles from “Ug the Bug” to “Eep the Sheep,” you can see that the rhyme is not exactly subtle. Therein lies its charm. While its simple rhymes make it perfect for building early reading skills, Shannon McNeill’s action-packed illustrations (awash in a delicious color palette) give readers of all ages plenty to snicker over. In “Ake the Snake,” for example, the snake has a cake, because he can bake. The snake, coiled by the lake (sporting a cupcake chef’s hat) is surrounded by baking ingredients and two tiny green traumatized bugs, who have indeed tried to take the snake cake, and therefore are being flung screaming into the lake, much to the dismay of another bug hiding behind a sack of what might be flour. We think it’s gutsy to write a poem as simple as “I am At, / At the cat. / Do you see Pat? / He is my rat. / I sat on Pat, / so he is flat.” And we like it. (Pat the flat rat doesn’t look too happy about it, however.) A wonderful primer for wee ones just starting to have fun with words. (Ages 2 to 5) –Karin Snelson —

2. Selections from: Tea and Bannock Stories: First Nations Community of Poetic Voices (Simon Fraser University, First Nations Studies. Compiled by annie ross, Brandon Bob, Eve Chuang and the Chuang Family, Steve Davis, Robert Pictou)

 

3. Selections from Poetry Foundation: Poetry for Children

Ideas for Teachers: (from the League of Canadian Poets)

Poetry Play Stations

Poetry play stations use different techniques to encourage young readers to craft poems. Here are some great stations to include:

Erasure poetry: Using a page of existing text, use a black marker to complete cross out sections of the text — the words or phrases that remain can be strung together to form an original poem! Part of the beauty of erasure poem is how the entire page looks when completed, blacked-out sections and all.  Try it with a newspaper article!

Found poetry: Found poetry is very similar to erasure poetry — well, erasure poetry is a kind of found poetry — but with a little more freedom. Again using an existing text, participants select words or phrases from the text that they think will make a great poem: using the found words and phrases, they can play with line breaks, stanzas, and other ways of construction an original poem from the found text!

Book spine poetry: This is a great poetic experiment that takes over Twitter every April — using as few as three or as many as… well, as many as you can stack, create a poem using the titles of books as they appear on the spines. These make excellent photos and are great for sharing!

Magnet poetry: A classic! Choosing words from a pile of individual words to string together an original poem. This could be from a magnetic poetry set, but you could also simply prepare an assortment of words for participants to choose from.” (Source: League of Canadian Poets)

 

Pink Shirt Day 2020

Mark your calendar: Pink Shirt Day is February 26nd, 2020.

Where did Pink Shirt Day come from?

In 2007 in Nova Scotia, Grade 12 students David Shepherd, Travis Price and a few friends saw that a grade 9 student was being bullied for wearing a pink shirt on the first day of school.

They knew they had to do something to show that this kind of behavior was not okay.

They decided to go out and buy pink shirts and hand them out to other students to wear.

By the end of that week, most of the students in the school were wearing pink shirts to show support for the grade 9 student who was bullied.

On February 26th, wear something pink to show that we are all working together to erase bullying in our community.

2020 Focus: Lift Each Other Up

“The theme for this year’s Pink Shirt Day is “Lift each other up”, a simple but powerful message encouraging us to look beyond our differences and celebrate the things that make us unique. When we lift each other up, we see beyond the things that separate us and see instead the things that unite us as people; we can see how our differences are beautiful.

In a world of people tearing each other down, it is more important than ever to focus on being kind to one another. This Pink Shirt Day and every day, let’s Lift Each Other Up.” (pinkshirtday.ca)

“Kindness is……”

Here are some great recommendations for books about kindness.  Visit your school library to find even more!

pinkshirt_kindbooks_2017

Have a Heart Day 2020

This message is from the First Nations Child & Family Caring Society of Canada (FNCFCS) website:

“Have a Heart Day is a child and youth-led reconciliation campaign that brings together caring Canadians to help ensure First Nations children have the services they need to grow up safely at home, get a good education, be healthy, and be proud of who they are.

Watch “End the Gap – Fair Funding For First Nations Schools”

 

Activity Ideas:

  • Host a Valentine’s Day party to raise awareness in your school or community. Choose a day leading up to Valentine’s Day that makes sense for your class or community. Click here for a link to a poster you can use.
  • Spread the word through social media like YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook. Use the hashtag #HaveaHeartDay and/or #JourneeAyezUnCoeur.

Explore the Have a Heart Day website to download Have a Heart Day resources.

Through activities like Have a Heart Day, we are creating a movement where the landscape of Canada is only one of honour and possibility for First Nations children.”

FNCFCS also shared this music video by N’we Jinan Artists “Important to Us”, written and performed by students at Pierre Elliot Trudeau School.

Their message is inspiring:

“No matter where you’re from,

let’s fill our home with colour and love.”

Teachers: More resources are available here

  • Follow Cindy Blackstock on Twitter (Cindy Blackstock @cblackst) and/or F.N. Caring Society on Twitter(F.N. Caring Society @Caringsociety)
  • Explore the Have a Heart Day website to download Have a Heart Day resources.

FVRL 2019 Summer Reading Club

SUMMER READING CLUBS

“Imagine the possibilities! Dream and discover endless possibilities all summer when you join FVRL’s 2019 Summer Reading Club. There is a club for everyone!

  • Read To Me (0 to Preschool) Share stories, record reading, collect stickers, win prizes and get a medal.
  • Kids (grades K to 6) Collect a reading record, enter prize draws, come to fun shows and earn a medal. Just read every day!
  • Teens (grades 7 to 12) Read. Record. Repeat. It begins when you pick up an SRC reading record. Includes chances to win fantastic prizes.
  • Adults Take home a reading record and mark your reading to enter prize draws. The more you read, the more chances to win.

How do I join? Sign up starts June 21 and continues throughout the summer. Visit your favourite FVRL location to join.

How does it work? You and your family members can pick up a reading record at your local library! Record every day that you read for fifteen minutes or more! You can read at home, in the library, on a beach, anywhere! Once you have recorded seven days of reading, come back to the library for stickers and prizes!

Programs and Events

It wouldn’t be Summer Reading Club without a great lineup of events throughout the summer. We have storytellers, puppet shows, parties, awards ceremonies and more! Check out our spectacular guest performers at a library near you.

  • The Great Gordini: Join the Great Gordini for a show filled with magic tricks, wacky fun, and a lot of opportunities to participate.
  • Karima Essa: Experience the magic and joy of dance and storytelling as Karima Essa performs Bollywood dance.
  • Tiffany Stone: Join poet Tiffany Stone for poems and rhymes about flaming flamingos, baaaad animals and rainbow colored clothes.
  • The Well Worn Trail: Discover fascinating facts about Canadian animals and their habitats. Storytellers Rob and Lillian use puppetry, songs and story to kindle the wonder of nature.

Visit our Events page for a full list of SRC 2019 Events!

Accessible Summer Reading Club

Find accessible Summer Reading Club titles through NNELS. FVRL also has ebook and audiobook formats to better serve customers with perceptual disabilities. Ask library staff for more information.

The possibilities you explore this summer are limited only by your imagination when you join 2019 Summer Reading Club!” (Source: FVRL, 2019)

National Poetry Month

 

From the League of Canadian Poets:

Celebrate nature with poetry this April!

“The League of Canadian Poets invites you to celebrate the 21st annual National Poetry Month in April with nature – whether it’s mountain ranges, deserts, forests, oceans, or plains; whether it’s a cityscape or a landscape. Read, write, and share poetry that translates the emotional, practical, and reciprocal relationships we build – as individuals and communities – to the natural world onto the page.”

“What will you read this National Poetry Month? What events will you organize, attend? Will you start your own poetry writing project? Will you write your first poem? Will you share your poetry on stage for the first time?

Ideas for Teachers:

And now, let’s make a poetry party!

Poetry-palooza

Organize a poetry-palooza for a group of young readers to engage them with the many sides to poetry. Participants can read a poem aloud — original or not — to the others, or they could distribute their favourite written poem–again, original or not. But there’s more to poetry than the poems! Encourage young readers to write fanmail to their favourite poets, or take the fun even farther away from poetry and hide poems around the room (book spine poetry, anyone?), or have other poetry game stations for participants to engage with.

Poetry Play Stations

Poetry play stations use different techniques to encourage young readers to craft poems. Here are some great stations to include:

Erasure poetry: Using a page of existing text, use a black marker to complete cross out sections of the text — the words or phrases that remain can be strung together to form an original poem! Part of the beauty of erasure poem is how the entire page looks when completed, blacked-out sections and all.

Found poetry: Found poetry is very similar to erasure poetry — well, erasure poetry is a kind of found poetry — but with a little more freedom. Again using an existing text, participants select words or phrases from the text that they think will make a great poem: using the found words and phrases, they can play with line breaks, stanzas, and other ways of construction an original poem from the found text!

Book spine poetry: This is a great poetic experiment that takes over Twitter every April — using as few as three or as many as… well, as many as you can stack, create a poem using the titles of books as they appear on the spines. These make excellent photos and are great for sharing on social media!

Magnet poetry: A classic! Choosing words from a pile of individual words to string together an original poem. This could be from a magnetic poetry set, but you could also simply prepare an assortment of words for participants to choose from.” (Source: League of Canadian Poets)

Songs and Poems for Elementary Students (Source: CanTeach)

Read Aloud Challenge

 

Why is reading aloud important?

 

Does your school have some favourite read alouds to share? Send us a list or some book cover photos and we will post them here! 

MPSD Favourite Read Aloud books:

Mr. Cole recommends….

Learn more about the importance of reading aloud or sign up for the 21 day read aloud challenge here: http://readaloud.org/#

Follow the challenge on Twitter to see what others are reading #21DayReadAloud

Veterans Week 2019

Here are some resources that connect with the theme of Remembrance:

Our Freedom:

Radio Minute: Tommy Prince

Additional Resources:

 

 

 

 

Canadian Encyclopedia Articles:

  • Interactive Activity: (Ages 10+)

Over the Top: An Interactive Adventure

“An activity created by the Canadian War Museum to help students understand the First World War from a soldier’s perspective. The activity’s interactive nature and its animation-based format will appeal to younger students. Includes a glossary of terms. (Recommended for ages 10 and up.)”

Additional Resources:

 

Dot Day 2018

Make your mark this school year!  September 15th-ish is International Dot Day!  Join the celebration of creativity, courage and collaboration! Based on the story “The Dot” by Peter H. Reynolds, this is a great way to start the year by celebrating the creative talents of children.

Watch the videos below to see examples of students collaborating creatively and get inspired to create:

 Resources:

Clip Art Collection (by Peter H. Reynolds)

International Dot Day website: Get Inspired

Multi-language Dot Day Posters

Poster Gallery:  (many themes, including A Thinking Journey & Think Globally)

Sparking the Creative Spirit: Tips for Inspiring Writing, Creativity, Self-Expression and a Wonderful Journey

 

 

National Indigenous Peoples Day

2019 Events in Mission:

Information and Resources for National Indigenous Peoples Day:

From the Government of Canada: “June 21 is National Indigenous Peoples Day. This is a day for all Canadians to recognize and celebrate the unique heritage, diverse cultures and outstanding contributions of First NationsInuit and Métis peoples. The Canadian Constitution recognizes these three groups as Aboriginal peoples, also known as Indigenous peoples.

Although these groups share many similarities, they each have their own distinct heritage, language, cultural practices and spiritual beliefs.

In cooperation with Indigenous organizations, the Government of Canada chose June 21, the summer solstice, for National Aboriginal Day, now known as National Indigenous Peoples Day. For generations, many Indigenous peoples and communities have celebrated their culture and heritage on or near this day due to the significance of the summer solstice as the longest day of the year.”

Additional Resources:

FVRL 2018 Summer Reading Club

FVRL 2018 SUMMER READING CLUB

Move, groove and prove that you can make a Motion Commotion this summer when you join FVRL’s 2018 Summer Reading Club. There is a club for everyone! Sign up starts June 21 and continues throughout the summer. Visit your favourite FVRL location to join.

 

Read To Me (0 to Preschool)

Share stories, record reading, collect stickers, win prizes and get a medal.

Kids (grades K to 6)

Ready, set, go! Collect a reading record, enter prize draws, come to fun shows and earn a medal. Just read every day!

Teens (grades 7 to 12)

Read. Record. Repeat. It all begins when you pick up a reading record. There will be lots of chances to win fantastic prizes.

Adults

Get a move on! Take home a reading record and mark your reading to enter prize draws. The more you read, the more chances to win.

There are oh so many ways to make a Motion Commotion when you join 2018 Summer Reading Club!

Have a Heart Day 2019

This message is from the First Nations Child & Family Caring Society of Canada (FNCFCS) website:

“Have a Heart Day is a child and youth-led reconciliation campaign that brings together caring Canadians to help ensure First Nations children have the services they need to grow up safely at home, get a good education, be healthy, and be proud of who they are.

Watch “End the Gap – Fair Funding For First Nations Schools”

Listen to the ideas of children:

haveaheart

 

Activity Ideas:

  • Host a Valentine’s Day party to raise awareness in your school or community. Choose a day leading up to Valentine’s Day that makes sense for your class or community.
  • Spread the word through social media like YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook. Use the hashtag #HaveaHeartDay.

Explore the Have a Heart Day website to download Have a Heart Day resources.

Through activities like Have a Heart Day, we are creating a movement where the landscape of Canada is only one of honour and possibility for First Nations children.”

FNCFCS also shared this music video by N’we Jinan Artists “Important to Us”, written and performed by students at Pierre Elliot Trudeau School.

Their message is inspiring:

“No matter where you’re from,

let’s fill our home with colour and love.”

Teachers: More resources are available here

  • Follow Cindy Blackstock on Twitter (Cindy Blackstock @cblackst) and/or F.N. Caring Society on Twitter(F.N. Caring Society @Caringsociety)
  • Explore the Have a Heart Day website to download Have a Heart Day resources.

Pink Shirt Day 2019

Mark your calendar: Pink Shirt Day is February 27nd, 2019.

Wear something pink to show that we are all working together to erase bullying in our community.

2019 Focus: Cyberbullying

Watch the clip below.  What is kindness to you, to your family and how can you show kindness in your community?

Think about this prompt:

“Kindness is……”

Here are some great recommendations for books about kindness.  Visit your school library to find even more!

pinkshirt_kindbooks_2017

Riot of Reading 2018

The Riot of Reading Solutions 15th annual Family Literacy Fair is on Saturday, February 3rd from 11 – 3 pm at Ecole Mission Central.

Mission Teacher Librarians will be there and our theme is “Winter Rainy Day Family Activities”.  Visit our table to see connecting stories and make a winter/rainy day craft!

Exciting events taking place that day include:

  • Pizza, cake and refreshments.
  • Exciting entertainment  (New and great surprises! )

How can you participate in Family Literacy Day? Here are some ideas for inspiration:

 

Activity Ideas:

fld_2017_eng fld_2017_fr

Source: ABC Life Literacy Learn at Play, Everyday Activities (English and French)

Picture Book Month

November is Picture Book Month! 

Author Katie Davis produced this video with quotes from beloved and famous authors and illustrators all answering the same question;

“What is a picture book?”

For Students:

What is a picture book to you?  Do you have a favourite picture book?  Visit your school library to borrow picture books this month.

You might like these books for “Roc Your Mocs” Day in November:

moccasins3moccasins moccasins2  moccasins4

Calendar:

How the Calendar Works

“Each day, an author/illustrator, our Picture Book Month Champion, is listed. On that day he/she has an essay posted on the Picture Book Month website about the importance of picture books. Check back every day of November for a new essay.

Each day is also marked with a theme. Use these daily themes to plan story times, blog about your favorite picture books in that theme, or create themed displays.” (Source: Picture Book Month, Calendar)

For Teachers:

  • Picture Book Month Teacher’s Guide (Ideas for using picture books in ELA, Science, Math and Social Studies)
  • Adrienne Gear’s new units featuring picture books for Grades 2-7 ” We Are All Connected

Why Picture Books are Important:

rukhsana-khan-book-coverRukhsana Khan

rob-scotton-book-coverRob Scotton

ame-dyckman-coverAme Dyckman

Veteran’s Week 2017

#CanadaRemembers

Veterans’ Week 2017, November 5 to 11

Remembering Passchendaele

“Canadians have a proud history of bravely serving in the cause of peace and freedom over the years. A name from Canada’s First World War military heritage that still stirs emotions is “Passchendaele.” On a muddy battlefield in northwest Belgium, Canadians overcame almost unimaginable hardships to win an impressive victory in the fall of 1917.” (Source: Veterans Affairs Canada)

Link to Indigenous-Canadian Veterans information: (Indigenous Veterans Day is November 8th)

Radio Minute: Tommy Prince

Information about and significance of the National Aboriginal Veterans Monument :national-aboriginal-monument

Song: A Pittance of Time

Interactive Activity: (Ages 10+)

Over the Top: An Interactive Adventure

“An activity created by the Canadian War Museum to help students understand the First World War from a soldier’s perspective. The activity’s interactive nature and its animation-based format will appeal to younger students. Includes a glossary of terms. (Recommended for ages 10 and up.)”

Canadian Encyclopedia Articles:

Additional Resources:

 

Mission Children’s Festival

Message from the organizers (Mission Arts Council):

This year the Mission Arts Council’s 22nd annual Fraser Valley Children’s Festival is on June 10th, 2018 at Fraser River Heritage Park, from 10:00 am – 4:00 pm. Admission is FREE, and parking is by donation. There will be some food trucks on location, but you’re welcome to bring a picnic lunch.

WE WANT YOU TO HAVE A GOOD TIME AT THE FESTIVAL

1. Dress for the weather Rain or shine, the Festival will go on! Make sure to pack a raincoat or umbrella for a wet day and sunscreen for a sunny day!

2. Be safe and courteous. Don’t forget the buddy system! All children must be accompanied by an adult. Respect the personal space of all performers by ensuring the children are at a safe distance. Roving Performers are people too!

3. Arrive any time between 10 am and 4pm. At our main stage we do have a tight schedule and we try to have all shows start on time. Come early, check out the event and pick the show you want to see. Get your favourite seat, either on the grass or even better bring a lawn chair, sit back, relax and enjoy the show!

4. Plan your day; there is a lot to do and see at the Fraser Valley Children’s Festival. In addition to all of the great Festival shows and activities, you never know what creative fun will happen at the Festival, so leave a little time for the unexpected! In addition to theChildren’s Festival have a walk around the beautiful Fraser River Heritage Park and enjoy the vista’s of the Fraser River and Sumas Mountain.

5. Nourish the soul and your belly Plan to have lunch at the Festival. Our vendors provide good healthy food and yummy treats, or if you like, bring a picnic. There are lots of places on site to sit down and enjoy a lunch!

Science Odyssey

Ten days of discovery and innovation

May 12-21st, 2017

“Science Odyssey is Canada’s largest celebration of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, featuring fun and inspiring experiences in museums, research centres, laboratories and classrooms from coast to coast.

Powered by NSERC, Science Odyssey demonstrates how discoveries and innovations shape our daily lives and foster a strong science culture in Canada.” (Source: Government of Canada)

Click on the images below for details:

Click on the poster to see detailed experiments that go with these activities!