Home Reading Resources

The e-book page in the Books section of this website has lots of links to free-online books and stories.  Here are a few of our favourites and more that have been made available specially for kids this spring:

“Indigenous Storybooks Canada is designed specifically for children, families, community members, and educators. Based on the open-licensed stories from the Little Cree Books collection, it makes the text, images, and audio of the stories available Indigenous Languages, English, and French as well as the most widely spoken immigrant and refugee languages of Canada. The Indigenous Storybook also has stories in Halqemeylem, Haida and Spanish. Share and enjoy!”

– Free audio stories

(Video and Audio, read by American actors)

“This engaging and colourfully illustrated collection of digital picture books for students will have many uses in the classroom and at home. Students can practice reading and listening skills, ELL students will develop their vocabulary, and parents will be able to encourage their children to practice reading. Many of the titles have been translated into French, and over 30 languages are featured as voice narrations.” (ERAC Review)

  • Tumblebook Library

    (K-6 children’s ebooks)

    • username: tumble735
    • password: books
  • TumbleMath:

    (K-6 math ebooks)

    • username: tumble2020
    • password: A3b5c6
  • Scholastic Digital Resources:
    • Bookflix (K-3) is a curated database that pairs fiction and non-fiction books, and a great tool for reading aloud with your child. The resource reinforces reading skills while introducing children to a world of knowledge and exploration.
    • Literacy Place Shared E-Reading (K-3)  is a compilation of digital books with reading prompts and audio for children to follow along with. Teaching plans also included.
    • TrueFlix (Gr.3-5)  helps children strengthen literacy skills, build science and social studies knowledge, and cultivate 21st-century skills. Watch, read, and learn cool facts about people, science, and history.
    • ScienceFlix (Gr.4-9)  offers teachers and parents hands-on projects, activities, videos, and more to help kids learn about science.
  • Scholastic Learn at Home (Early Learning – Grade 9, American)

The site supports students with approximately three hours of learning opportunities per day, including projects, articles and stories, virtual field trips, reading and geography challenges, and more. These daily learning opportunities were carefully curated by our editors to reduce the burden on teachers and families needing to create meaningful learning experiences.

The Scholastic Learn at Home website does not require a username or password and is open freely to all, on any device. They are designed to limit the need for printing and allow students to learn independently or with their families.

Home Learning Resources: Curio

There are many digital resources being released free of charge. This week, we are featuring some spring nature videos published by Curio.  

We might not be able to go outside as much as we like, but these adventures might inspire you to look and listen to the nature in your own backyard.

Nature Mystery:

“The Case of the Quiet Diggers”

Nature Movement Song:

“Frogs”

Nature DIY ideas:

Daisy and the Gumboot Kids: Daisy the mouse loves nature! In each episode she guides children through the creation of a new and exciting nature craft. Daisy brings wonder and imagination to the craft table and encourages children to explore the world outside!

Daisy & The Gumboot Kids

 

 

Black History Month 2020

“Black History Month is an opportunity for all Canadians to learn about the many contributions Black Canadians have made to Canada. This year’s theme for Black History Month is “Canadians of African Descent: Going forward, guided by the past”. This was inspired by the theme of the United Nations’ International Decade for People of African Descent (2015-2024).

Feet forward, head turned backward, the Sankofa bird reflects on the past to build a successful future.” (Government of Canada)

Viola Desmond: 

Additional Resources:

 

Pink Shirt Day 2020

Mark your calendar: Pink Shirt Day is February 26nd, 2020.

Where did Pink Shirt Day come from?

In 2007 in Nova Scotia, Grade 12 students David Shepherd, Travis Price and a few friends saw that a grade 9 student was being bullied for wearing a pink shirt on the first day of school.

They knew they had to do something to show that this kind of behavior was not okay.

They decided to go out and buy pink shirts and hand them out to other students to wear.

By the end of that week, most of the students in the school were wearing pink shirts to show support for the grade 9 student who was bullied.

On February 26th, wear something pink to show that we are all working together to erase bullying in our community.

2020 Focus: Lift Each Other Up

“The theme for this year’s Pink Shirt Day is “Lift each other up”, a simple but powerful message encouraging us to look beyond our differences and celebrate the things that make us unique. When we lift each other up, we see beyond the things that separate us and see instead the things that unite us as people; we can see how our differences are beautiful.

In a world of people tearing each other down, it is more important than ever to focus on being kind to one another. This Pink Shirt Day and every day, let’s Lift Each Other Up.” (pinkshirtday.ca)

“Kindness is……”

Here are some great recommendations for books about kindness.  Visit your school library to find even more!

pinkshirt_kindbooks_2017

Have a Heart Day 2020

This message is from the First Nations Child & Family Caring Society of Canada (FNCFCS) website:

“Have a Heart Day is a child and youth-led reconciliation campaign that brings together caring Canadians to help ensure First Nations children have the services they need to grow up safely at home, get a good education, be healthy, and be proud of who they are.

Watch “End the Gap – Fair Funding For First Nations Schools”

 

Activity Ideas:

  • Host a Valentine’s Day party to raise awareness in your school or community. Choose a day leading up to Valentine’s Day that makes sense for your class or community. Click here for a link to a poster you can use.
  • Spread the word through social media like YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook. Use the hashtag #HaveaHeartDay and/or #JourneeAyezUnCoeur.

Explore the Have a Heart Day website to download Have a Heart Day resources.

Through activities like Have a Heart Day, we are creating a movement where the landscape of Canada is only one of honour and possibility for First Nations children.”

FNCFCS also shared this music video by N’we Jinan Artists “Important to Us”, written and performed by students at Pierre Elliot Trudeau School.

Their message is inspiring:

“No matter where you’re from,

let’s fill our home with colour and love.”

Teachers: More resources are available here

  • Follow Cindy Blackstock on Twitter (Cindy Blackstock @cblackst) and/or F.N. Caring Society on Twitter(F.N. Caring Society @Caringsociety)
  • Explore the Have a Heart Day website to download Have a Heart Day resources.

Learning for the 21st Century

MindShift

KQED Public Media for Northern CA

readingpowergear

teaching ideas for reading and writing with links to children's literature

Sci/Why

Learning for the 21st Century

Watch. Connect. Read.

Learning for the 21st Century